Rob Glover

Rob GloverCLAS-Honors Preceptor of Political Science
113B N. Stevens Hall
207.581.1880
robert.glover@maine.edu

 

B.A. University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth
M.A. and Ph.D. University of Connecticut

 

  • Scholarly Interests
    • Immigration Policy, Community Engagement, Democratic Theory, Public Policy
  • Why I Teach in Honors:

I came to the Honors College in 2011, as one of the newly-hired “joint preceptors” splitting my teaching between the Honors College and the Political Science department. I remember when I was in the process of applying for the position, trying to familiarize myself with the culture of Honors and the dynamics of the institution. I came across an article written by our late and deeply admired Dean, Charlie Slavin, entitled “Defining Honors Culture.”

The piece defines honors culture as the adventurous engagement with unfamiliar ideas and a process of “intellectual risk-taking.” As I reflected upon this piece, I found so much that resonated with my own thinking on higher education. We professorial types are often too compartmentalized, too reticent to engage ideas outside our narrow area of expertise. We tend to balk at the idea of stepping outside of our comfort zones. However, in so doing, I feel we undercut our promise as academics, our ability to critically question received wisdom, our capacity to devise and formulate new ways of knowing the world. Upon reading Charlie’s piece, long before I’d even been offered a job, I thought to myself, “This is an endeavor of which I want to be a part.”

Happily, upon arriving at UMaine, I discovered this ethos of intellectual risk-taking embodied in the talented and thoughtful students I encountered in the Honors College. Honors teaching enables me to engage with young minds that think about their world in interesting and innovative ways. It lets me play a hand in the students’ intellectual development, but also to learn from them and with them. The true gift of teaching in Honors is that no one who truly engages with the curriculum, be they first year students or greying professors, ever truly stops learning. As someone who finds intellectual exchange exhilarating and deeply gratifying, the Honors College is a wonderful place to be.