Honors Goes to D.C.

Through the generosity of a long-time donor, The Honors College was fortunate to revive a traditional spring pilgrimage to Washington D.C., bringing 29 students to explore the city. The group, representing first-years through graduating seniors and a diverse background of majors, had the opportunity to see the National Monuments, museums, memorials, and additionally met with both Senator Angus King and Senator Susan Collins. While some events were a full-group activity, a majority of the time spent in the city was for students to seize on their own interests and go where they most wanted to visit.

 

Honors Graduate Celebration

The annual celebration of Honors students and faculty was held on May 12th in the Wells Conference Center, and showcased students of interdisciplinary majors completing their Honors requirements. The Honors Thesis, a final requirement to graduate with Honors, is the culmination of HON 498 and HON 499 thesis courses, and a partnership with faculty members. Each thesis represents a student’s particular interest, and countless hours of research, writing, and creation. For 2017, we recognized 88 seniors that had completed or are in the final stages of thesis completion, and their dedicated advising faculty that worked to make each project a reality.

Each student was personally congratulated with a certificate, medallion of the Honors logo (to be worn at graduation) and a “vase” as part of the Honors Celebration tradition.

Three Preceptors Promoted

When you see CLAS-Honors preceptors Robert Glover, Sarah Harlan-Haughey, and Jordan Labouff, congratulate them on their recent awards of tenure and promotion to the rank of Associate Professor!

The three preceptors hold joint appointments between Honors and departments in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences–Political Science, English, and Psychology, respectively.

Tenure is the academy’s way of rewarding excellence and recognizing future promise in teaching, scholarship, and public service. Glover is known nationally for his work as a community-engaged scholar, teaching innovative courses that allow students to bring their interests and skills to bear on problems of local communities and other stakeholders. He recently co-edited a 3-volume series on Honors Education in Transition (Rowman and LIttlefield, 2016-17). Harlan-Haughey is a scholar of medieval literature: her book, The Ecology of The English Outlaw in Medieval Literature: From Fenland to Greenwood was published by Ashgate in 2016. She organized and hosted a Symposium on Saga and Story in 2016-2017 with support from the University of Maine Humanities Center. Labouff is nationally recognized for his work on how belief influences attitudes with a particular focus on psychology of religion and cross-cultural psychology. He serves as an associate editor of the Archives of the Psychology of Religion and is on the planning committee for the conference on the Psychology of Spirituality and Religion.

These three preceptors have been dedicated mentors for dozens of Honors students over the last five years. The University of Maine and the Honors College look forward to with anticipation to their future scholarly work and accomplishments as teachers and mentors.

Honors Scholar-Athletes Recognized

On January 30th, 2017 the UMaine Athletics Department celebrated the 28th annual Scholar-Athlete Recognition Ceremony. Since 1989, Scholar-Athlete Awards have been given annually to student-athletes who have earned a 3.0 or better GPA in the previous spring and fall semesters and/or have maintained a 3.0 or better accumulative GPA.

Student-athletes who earned a 3.0 or better in their first semester at the University of Maine joined the group of Rising Stars.

Of the 273 athletes recognized, 27 were Honors students. Congratulations to these students who represent UMaine so well both in varsity competition and in the classroom. For more information see the following link:  http://goblackbears.com/news/2017/1/30/2017_Scholar_Athletes.aspx

Honors College Student-Athletes Recognized:

Arnold,Nicole
Women’s Ice Hockey
Political Science and Economics (DM) —Honors College
Bronze
Ball,Kaitlyn
Women’s Soccer
Computer Engineering — Honors College
Rising Star
Bromley,Alexandria
Women’s Swimming
Food Science and Human Nutrition —Honors College
Rising Star
Courtney,Justin
Baseball
Management — Honors College
Silver
Driscoll,Sean
Men’s Swimming
Zoology — Honors College
Bronze
Dunn,Nigel
Men’s Track
Engineering — Undeclared — Honors College
Rising Star
Fandel,Olivia
Women’s Cross Country & Track
English — Honors College
Rising Star
Goins,Faythe
Softball
Marine Science — Honors College
Silver
Green,Sydney
Women’s Cross Country & Track
Psychology — Honors College
Bronze
Groening,Patrick
Men’s Track
Liberal Arts & Sciences — Undeclared — Honors College
Rising Star
Guarnieri,Lucia
Women’s Track
Biology — Honors College
Bronze
Hebert,Benjamin
Men’s Swimming
Engineering Physics — Honors College
Gold
Hill,Cassidy
Women’s Track
Biology — Honors College
Rising Star
Jorge,Dylan
Men’s Swimming
Wildlife Ecology — Honors College
Rising Star
Kay,John
Football
Finance — Honors College
Bronze
Lavigueur,Beatrix
Women’s Swimming
Athletic Training — Honors College
Bronze
Lesko,Daniel
Men’s Cross Country & Track
Bioengineering — Honors College
Bronze
Nightingale,Lauren
Cheering
Bioengineering — Honors College
Bronze
Pominova,Mariya
Women’s Swimming
Economics — Honors College
Silver
Sansoucie,Mikaella
Women’s Track
Engineering — Undeclared — Honors College
Rising Star
Semmel,Sierra
Women’s Ice Hockey
Biology — Honors College
Rising Star
Shuman,Amanda
Women’s Cross Country & Track
Marine Science — Honors College
Silver
Smith,Hannah
Women’s Cross Country & Track
Zoology — Honors College
Bronze
Stefl,Hannah
Women’s Cross Country & Track
Food Science and Human Nutrition —Honors College
Gold
Tanner,Tiffany
Women’s Track
International Affairs — Honors College
Rising Star
Torchia,Brittany
Women’s Track
Marine Science — Honors College
Rising Star
Yost,Sierra
Women’s Cross Country & Track
Chemical Engineering — Honors College
Rising Star

Rezendes Ethics Competition and Workshop

The Honors College is excited to announce the Rezendes Ethics Essay Competition of 2017! All current undergraduate students at the University of Maine are invited to submit an 8 to 10 page essay that focuses on ethics, broadly construed. Papers on any topic of ethical concern are welcome, but see the link for suggested focus and other requirements here.

Each year, the competition has a designated “theme,” which students can use as a prompt, but are not required to address. The topic this year is as follows:

Citizenship, Democracy, and Conflict

What is a citizen? What ethical stance should a person take in their role as citizen towards issues that divide a society? Is being a citizen a contested idea? Does government have a role in promoting citizenship or is it the product of citizen action? Citizenship is at the heart of many current debates about immigration, terrorism, refugee crises and so forth. Some example topics include:

  • Are there limits to methods of interrogation in the service of national security? Are citizens and non-citizens to be treated differently?
  • What is our ethical responsibility for refugees: people displaced by war, famine, or climate change?
  • How does migration of people across political boundaries—whether due to famine, war, or economic hardship—affect our view of citizenship?
  • What are the ethical justifications of perpetual war?

There will also be a workshop for those writing an essay, held on Wednesday, Feb 8, at 4 PM (Balentine 100) there will be an Ethics Essay Competition Workshop with Prof. Don Beith open to all contest participants:

This interactive, hands on, fun workshop will take students through the steps of writing an effective ethics essay. We’ll cover the basic ethical approaches, with a list of online resources that can help you make progress on your own. We’ll do a mock paper outline. And we’ll discuss tips and strategies for writing your essay and overcoming obstacles. Open to any students, but especially designed for students who might submit to the Rezendes Ethics Essay Contest.

No matter what your major, if you have an opinion on an ethical topic, we want to read your submission!

Mitchell Center Awards in Honors!

Yesterday afternoon, the Senator George J. Mitchell Center for Sustainability Solutions hosted an awards party that honored tremendous work done by students and faculty.

We are pleased to announce that Honors student Brady Davis was the recipient of the “Outstanding Contribution to Sustainability Research by an Undergraduate Student” award!

We would also like to congratulate Travis Blackmer, who received an award for outstanding service as a mentor for an Honors Thesis!

National Collegiate Honors Conference: Seattle

Welcome back NCHC travelers! Fifteen students attended and presented their work at the National Collegiate Honors Conference in Seattle Washington over the long weekend. It was a great success for all presenters! The group had additional time to explore the city and experience the West Coast.

After roughly 20 hours of flight and bus voyage, 5,861 miles, and 5 days of travel and conference, we congratulate the students on a job extremely well done!

The presentations were as follows:

  1. Cleo Barker, international affairs, “Expanding your borders to know yourself: Synthesizing honors and study abroad”
  2. Donncha Coyle, philosophy and political science, “Losing our breath: Articulating a hermeneutic pedagogy in an honors seminar”
  3. Brady Davis, business management, “Opportunities and challenges: Integrating Honors College student leadership with Student Government” and “Community food hub: A Business model to fight hunger”
  4. Emily Duran-Frontera, food science and human nutrition, “Diversity as an empowerment tool: Views from a Puerto Rican and Columbian at the University of Maine”
  5. Chris Gilbert, wildlife ecology, “Opportunities and challenges: Integrating Honors College student leadership with Student Government”
  6. Aleah Granger, psychology, “Muslim and Arab prejudice: Understanding our emotions across cultures”
  7. Tyler Hicks, psychology, “Losing our breath: Articulating a hermeneutic pedagogy in an honors seminar”
  8. Afton Hupper, ecology and environmental science, “Community food hub: A business model to fight hunger”
  9. Courtney Jurson, kinesiology and physical education, “Expanding your borders to know yourself: Synthesizing honors and study abroad”
  10. Amy Lyons, management and international affairs, “Honors and the cult of personality: Exploring the ethics of undergrad mentorship and research”
  11. Ed Medeiros, zoology and international affairs, “Honors and the cult of personality: Exploring the ethics of undergrad mentorship and research”
  12. Matthew Sullivan, zoology, “The transdisciplinary benefits of laboratory science-based research”
  13. Aliya Uteuova, political science and mass communications, “Expand the journey: Marketing the Honors College to international students”
  14. Jasmine Waite, biochemistry, “The transdisciplinary benefits of laboratory science-based research.”
  15. Kimberley Crowley, was selected to participate in a poetry master class.

Fairing the Edge with Mark Pettegrow

The Honors College was pleased to host Mark Pettegrow, Distinguished Honors Graduate in fine arts from the class of 1981! Mr. Pettegrow gave a public talk Tuesday afternoon, Fairing the Edge: In Search of Eloquent Form. After the lecture, a small reception was held at the President’s House, where four pieces were on display.

Mr. Pettegrow stayed in the Honors Faculty Suite in Colvin Hall and was able to have breakfast with Honors students in 401 Colvin on Wednesday, just steps from the suite. Breakfast with Mr. Pettegrow was an enjoyable event, discussing a wide range of topics from personal artistic experience to current events. We invite students to attend future breakfast events, as it truly is a unique opportunity to ask questions and understand the motives behind unique and exciting professional work.

The Honors 180 class was also invited to a special event at the President’s house, where Mr. Pettegrow discussed his pieces and explained his personal journey through the arts as a student and a professional artist.

The Honors College is immensely grateful to graduates like Mark Pettegrow, as they return to broaden horizons, provide meaningful insight into the world after college, and facilitate discussion about topics of intellectual and emotional value.

 

Crowded Debate Watch Party

A huge number of students attended a Debate Watch Party in the Memorial Union last night (Monday, Sept 26)! The North Pod was packed, and quickly became standing-room-only to see the screen. It was an incredible event, giving students the chance to watch in a public setting, and participate in a moderated discussion of the aftermath. In order to maintain a fair event, no pre- or post-debate punditry was shown, and students viewed the forum with both Democrat and Republican campus representatives present.

Students, don’t forget to register and get out and vote! More resources can be found at the UMaine UVote website:https://umaine.edu/studentlife/home/uvote/

Honors Breakfast with David L. Greene

Last Thursday, honors students and faculty enjoyed breakfast with visiting lecturer Dr. David L. Greene. As part of the Geddes W. Simpson lecture series, Greene visited the UMaine campus to discuss reducing greenhouse gas emissions enough to mitigate the most severe effects of global climate change, new challenges for public policy, energy efficiency, the history of regulating automotive fuel economy, intended and unintended consequences of regulation, and the relationship between ideology and science in public policy.

The Honors College was pleased to partner in the visit by hosting Dr. Greene in the Honors Faculty Suite in Colvin Hall. The “price” for a lecturer staying in the Honors Suite is to have a catered breakfast with honors students during their stay. Breakfast with Dr. Greene was an enjoyable event, discussing the significance of infrastructure, the VW emissions scandal, American love and attachment to vehicles, and personal opinions of all perspectives.

We invite students to attend future breakfast events, as it truly is a unique opportunity to ask questions and understand the motives behind unique and exciting research.